On 19th May 2015, at the conclusion of a sensational case at the GMC, the careers of two promising young doctors were saved . 

The doctors had obtained overseas convictions in Spain for an offence of assault, arising from events during a stag weekend in Barcelona. Under the rules of the Fitness to Practise Panel they were unable to go behind the overseas convictions. The panel, however, heard compelling evidence that threw serious doubt upon the fairness of the proceedings giving rise to the convictions and concluded that the fitness to practise of neither doctor was impaired. 

The panel further concluded that, in the exceptional circumstances of the case, a warning was neither necessary or appropriate. 

The case received widespread publicity in the national and local press. 

The doctors were represented by Andrew Hockton, instructed by Katie Costello of BLM, Manchester and Kate Williams of RadcliffesLeBrasseur, Leeds.

Christopher Johnston QC has represented an 11-year-old claimant who suffered brain damage following his birth.

The boy was born with abnormally low blood sugar levels which were not monitored or treated.

Speaking at the High Court hearing, Christopher said “He now has the mind of a six-year-old with no prospect of improvement [and] is someone who will require care and support for the rest of his life.”

The settlement comprised a £1.45m lump sum plus index-linked periodical payment orders (PPOs) for care, case management, therapies and loss of earnings. On a traditional 2.5% discount rate multiplier approach the settlement was worth about £6.6m, but if the Claimant lives as long as expected this will equate to £13m in index-linked payments over his life span.

Charles Foster represented Dr. Dhanuson Dharmasena in the first ever prosecution under the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.

Dr. Dharmasena was a junior doctor who attended a Somali woman in labour. The woman had been infibulated as a child, and had subsequently been deinfibulated. The doctor made an incision through scar tissue in order to catheterise the urethra prior to effecting instrumental delivery. He then inserted a suture to stop bleeding from the wound. The prosecution said that this constituted FGM. The trial was contested for two and a half weeks before Sweeney J at Southwark Crown Court. The jury quickly acquitted.